Another Sudanese killed in anti-government protests

It’s the second week in a row that military personnel have killed demonstrators. A Sudanese man shot in an anti-government demonstration Sunday in the capital Khartoum was killed by police, according to the United…

Another Sudanese killed in anti-government protests

It’s the second week in a row that military personnel have killed demonstrators.

A Sudanese man shot in an anti-government demonstration Sunday in the capital Khartoum was killed by police, according to the United Nations refugee agency, joining a number of other protesters who were killed in recent days.

The clashes between Sudanese police and anti-government protesters were some of the deadliest since the unrest began more than two months ago. Khartoum police fired live ammunition into a crowd of protesters around the city center. Other protests were held at the government headquarters in Juba and also at locations in the south. The protests were sparked in November when the government raised prices on basic foodstuffs.

The new wave of unrest has raised concerns among international groups about an uncertain transition to civilian rule in Sudan, following the 2014 death of President Omar al-Bashir. Although the government put the death toll from the protests at more than 40, the U.N. agency said it did not have exact figures.

In a statement on Twitter, the U.N. refugee agency said it was informed by Khartoum authorities that the protests were peaceful and that the man shot to death at Kober district had died from a gunshot wound to the chest. The unnamed man was carrying his child who was not wounded, the U.N. agency said.

There was no immediate comment from Sudan’s government.

The conflict could still break out once again even as some 20,000 Sudanese refugees returned home from camps in Kenya.

Some parts of Khartoum residents reported that police fired tear gas to disperse demonstrators at Kober district.

The killing came after the Sudanese parliament last week approved a revised version of an interim constitution.

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