Doug Ford’s Tylenol ad busts its own credibility: Just like Rush Limbaugh’s/the veterans’ mental health pin

It’s hard to believe that a man who lost a race for mayor to one of the most underfunded candidates for mayor in decades would blow his political opportunity by thinking a Tylenol ad…

Doug Ford’s Tylenol ad busts its own credibility: Just like Rush Limbaugh’s/the veterans’ mental health pin

It’s hard to believe that a man who lost a race for mayor to one of the most underfunded candidates for mayor in decades would blow his political opportunity by thinking a Tylenol ad would get him elected to lead Canada’s second-largest city.

Doug Ford, brother of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and soon-to-be brother-in-law of Olivia Chow (the former Toronto city councillor) was convinced by the dealers in a Toronto drug-sales advertising campaign for Tylenol (said to prevent bleeding) that they could turn his bluff into a win.

The ad shows a character waiting for the pain to subside until the user drops a Tylenol packet into a rain puddle. Then the agent asks: “Where’s my B****?” The character next to him shakes his head. The man next to him shakes his head. Then a voiceover says: “I take mine wherever I go.” The London bus ad ends with the tagline: “Anywhere you can get it, this Tylenol can heal.”

Doug Ford brought the idea to his older brother, and the two began looking for a way to run this year’s election campaign using the ad. But Rob Ford later decided against it, which meant the spot would never see the light of day.

The ad idea never got far, because Mr. Ford claimed “too many people would get sick,” telling Toronto radio station AM640 that “this and fentanyl” were a “huge” health issue.

The ad could have been interpreted as an offensive campaign ad aimed at this specific drug, a criminal drug dealers peddling opium and morphine on street corners and inside convenient stores.

But there is no such thing as an “acceptable” drug. The reality is that there are five addictive drugs, and they are all dangerous.

When Rush Limbaugh endorsed “the troops in Afghanistan and Iraq …” he was endorsing a war the U.S. had no intention of ending and no guarantees it would succeed. The troops in Afghanistan and Iraq are wearing VA insurance benefits for injuries they suffered fighting a misguided “war on terror” that is being lost.

Instead of wearing a uniform, the troops are being paid, lived with, taken care of and asked to serve their country under a false banner.

The veterans should have worn a flag to convey the truth about the very bogus war they are fighting. But instead the troops who have earned their medals (commissions, decorations and achievement medals) wear pins worn to denote that they are wearing a medal and not carrying a flag.

We who have already retired from active duty in the military are grudgingly doing so because of how this country misled us and then spent the past decade risking our lives to bring about a phony “mission” that the U.S. never had the intention of ending.

The standard on providing an accurate picture of the true situation is a duty owed to everyone and one a veteran should respect.

In sending out faulty medical information, Mr. Ford violated the charter’s the duty to provide balanced and correct information. What’s more, the idea for the ad is an example of the egregious campaign tricks that can be used to demean someone, including an actual Canadian veteran who returned to work after serving his country.

The Toronto Hospital asked Mr. Ford to clear up the confusion, and he doesn’t look like he plans to do it. On Thursday, after a speech to the Toronto District School Board, Doug Ford refused to say whether he was sure it’s safe to resume shooting the Tylenol ad if he takes office as mayor.

Since Mr. Ford’s administration has not advanced the health of the public by conducting an audit of health care services available in the city, it should probably stop reporting on the results of that audit too.

There are two health care priorities for us all: ensuring that all Canadians have access to essential health care and ensuring that people, no matter where they live or what they do, get to the dentist or the eye doctor or the doctor when they are sick.

The Post’s information is provided for general informational purposes only and does not in any way suggest a position on the proposed Tylenol ad.

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