Drivers rage? Meet the people who cool traffic with a red light

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Drivers rage? Meet the people who cool traffic with a red light

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Planes and helicopters are extremely noisy, so, to keep them from interfering with signal flow, we built up redundant audio messages that tell users where to stop. But then we noticed something odd: There wasn’t enough space to turn the whole thing red: The signal for trail users was completely red.

Most crosswalks in Britain are red, although dedicated green and amber signals are widely used, too. But signal lights for pedestrians — which are usually yellow — turn red all the time. Why?

The Good Directives, as the minutes in the video description, state that Highways England is responsible for primary roads.

In other words, signals for motorists — and the people who share them — are in a different league: They work every day of the year and cater for the entire commuting population.

Traffic light poles in the UK are outfitted with audio messages that try to calm drivers and discourage them from making right turns on red. They won’t change during big rush hour; it’s after 12:00 a.m.

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