Justin Trudeau is building a diverse Canadian government

The new Trudeau cabinet got its big rollout a couple of days ago. It features two women ministers for the first time in Canadian history (and an all-female cabinet of 34). It’s an all-but-unanimous…

Justin Trudeau is building a diverse Canadian government

The new Trudeau cabinet got its big rollout a couple of days ago. It features two women ministers for the first time in Canadian history (and an all-female cabinet of 34).

It’s an all-but-unanimous cabinet, with one anonymous male minister showing up on Twitter asking how the new kids on the block got on:

Of course, without the one prominent racist and a double-speak-adverse member of parliament (Graham) and there wouldn’t be any of this at all.

So, sure, we have a lot of well-meaning societal optics. But look at the important stuff the prime minister needs to deal with first.

The economy

Look, the country is doing well. GDP is accelerating and consumer confidence is strong. There are jobs. But we’re still far from full employment. While unemployment in Canada is 4.4% as of mid-April, that figure has fluctuated from 3.6% to 4.8% for a little while now.

Justin Trudeau also has to make sure that taxes on the middle class don’t rise to fund spending on out-of-control infrastructure.

The muggings

Every parliamentary session, Liberals introduce a new bill that creates what’s called a “Motion to Withdraw Cooperation” (M-6). Parliament has to vote on whether to put into law that “Canada withdraws its cooperation with the United States on investigations into visa offenses.”

Last week, the Liberals introduced a revised version of the bill: one that leaves out any mention of pedophilia allegations against Canada’s ambassador to the Dominican Republic and a criminal complaint against Canadian diplomat Mary Coakley.

At the moment, there’s no reason to think Trudeau will tinker with the bill, and perhaps as it heads to the end of session, he won’t either. But we don’t want to see a repeat of the past.

If Trudeau revokes M-6, he’ll have to deal with Ottawa Post columnist Claudia Cattaneo’s reaction:

“As the world travels back to work, Trudeau has laid out the welcome mat, only to disallow it when required. The Prime Minister is in the process of closing the ‘Canadian Attitude’ with every passivity he shows toward Trump. It’s not the premise of being a world leader.”

The Levesque Triangle

While Trudeau doesn’t have any definitive plans to put an end to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s public subsidy, Canada is still reeling from election year squabbles over the funding and Roger Tousignant’s resignation as the Quebec Liberal Party leader after he refused to accept campaign donation limits.

As does the NDP and the Bloc Québécois.

“I was saying that the future of politics in this country is going to be entirely driven by public-sector employees and public servants, not political parties, and the only way you are going to be able to move a government is through Parliament,” Tousignant said, per the Toronto Star.

And as for the federal government’s budget balancing act? Canada is expected to run a surplus this year for the first time in 17 years, according to the World Bank.

But don’t be surprised if Trudeau decides that those extra billions will be better spent on fixing roads and highways than funding subsidies.

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