Justin Trudeau statement at COP26 in Bangkok

“Paradoxically enough, despite some important victories in Paris, risks are rising for the planet,” Trudeau said. After talking to U.S. President Donald Trump about climate change, Trudeau says the U.S. “is now not an…

Justin Trudeau statement at COP26 in Bangkok

“Paradoxically enough, despite some important victories in Paris, risks are rising for the planet,” Trudeau said.

After talking to U.S. President Donald Trump about climate change, Trudeau says the U.S. “is now not an isolated island” with its own objectives.

“I will say that between China and the U.S., I think we are going to be able to accomplish a vast amount of this,” Trudeau said.

After a busy week, Trudeau said the climate talks in Bangkok were “the first very close conversation I’ve had” with Trump.

“Of course, we don’t agree on every single issue but I think we are on the same page,” Trudeau said.

“Both countries recognize the importance of taking action,” he said.

“We’re both going to continue being environmentally friendly. This has nothing to do with us both being Americans,” Trudeau said.

Here’s the full remarks:

On Wednesday, I’m on my way from Calgary to Edinburgh. My trip is focused on climate action: co-hosting the third session of COP 26, working alongside the United States.

We will work to agree on a set of criteria that would determine which countries are entitled to join or remain members of the Paris Agreement, as parties to the convention.

My visit in Edinburgh will focus on gender equality and the environment. I will be joined by several world leaders from Europe and Africa to discuss the importance of leadership from the global North and the global South on gender issues, and of strong measures to tackle inequality and improve people’s livelihoods.

At the conference, we will focus on women’s economic empowerment, women’s land rights, women’s agriculture, fighting economic exploitation and violence against women.

We’ll be discussing how global development aid can work for women and girls, focusing on joint strategies and policies that will focus on the jobs, opportunities and voices of women and girls.

For too long, women’s opportunities to lead, or participate in, decision-making and development processes have been limited, and many women have had to live with a sense of second-class citizenship. Gender equality is a human right, the human rights fight is an economic fight, and women’s economic empowerment is a key part of the global green economy agenda.

Around the world, with too many decisions still made by men on behalf of women, violence against women remains a pervasive problem. It’s a society-wide challenge but one that we should rally together to address.

We will also be discussing how joint strategies and policies can help address economic exploitation and violence against women.

Countries like Ireland, Sweden and Colombia have already agreed to adopt an anti-corruption agenda that makes going after corruption a priority. In the coming years, governments will need to put stronger measures in place so it becomes commonplace that paying bribes are prosecuted.

We will also be discussing how joint strategies and policies can help address gender inequality, including sexual assault, which remains an epidemic, particularly around the world’s refugee and migration crises.

A developing country should be able to develop its economy, while holding power to account. That’s why Canada has emerged as a leader on this global initiative – working in tandem with the United States, Brazil, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa, Turkey, Switzerland, Israel, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Norway, Canada, Denmark, Austria, Denmark, South Korea, Hong Kong, Belgium, Australia, France, Germany, New Zealand, Estonia, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, Cyprus, Spain, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Spain, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania, Serbia, the Netherlands, Italy, Luxembourg, Cyprus, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Iceland, Slovakia, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, the UK, and China – to agree on criteria that would determine which countries are entitled to join or remain members of the Paris Agreement, as parties to the convention.

Both sides recognize the importance of taking action, both for our own sake and for the sake of our children and grandchildren.

Between China and the U.S., I think we are going to be able to accomplish a vast amount of this.

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