New Zealand prime minister’s livestream interrupted by toddler

New Zealand prime minister’s public address made on own channel is disrupted as her daughter eats toys and cries New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern’s livestream was interrupted by a toddler who continued to…

New Zealand prime minister’s livestream interrupted by toddler

New Zealand prime minister’s public address made on own channel is disrupted as her daughter eats toys and cries

New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern’s livestream was interrupted by a toddler who continued to eat toys and cry when she was made to go to bed.

In a livestream on the country’s Jacinda Ardern New Zealand YouTube channel, the first female leader of a major democracy was reading out a list of tweets featuring her. At one point, she attempted to finish reading the tweets when the video was interrupted by the toddler.

“She said ‘bang, bang’,” Ardern told reporters afterwards.

Jacinda Ardern (@jacindaardern) I’m pretty sure the tiny dancer has a big future ahead of her.

The toddler continued to throw toys on the floor as Ardern ate, ignored her pleas and continued the livestream.

Jacinda Ardern (@jacindaardern) “bang bang, no word. I need a sound!”

Jacinda Ardern (@jacindaardern) She said “Bang Bang No, No, Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Yes, Yes, No, Yes” … For a while.

“On the comeback kick?” “Bang bang, no word. I need a sound!”

When Ardern finally looked at the camera, the young daughter appeared to give the nation its first direct quote from the livestream.

New Zealand prime minister says she did not count number of selfies she took Read more

“I’m pretty sure the tiny dancer has a big future ahead of her,” she said.

On Monday, Ardern announced a free national drug test policy, saying children should not be denied medicine because their parents have not paid for it. On Monday afternoon, as she spoke, a young boy stopped by her side and went off for about 20 minutes, prompting Ardern to question his mother’s wisdom.

Ardern said she did not ask her mother who should pay for medication, but that such questions “show their ignorance of how stuff actually works”.

She told the New Zealand Herald her mother was a woman of “moralistic convictions”.

“The gap between government services and reality in this country, especially for some of our most vulnerable people, is a sickening thing to watch,” she said.

On Tuesday, Ardern said the reaction to her drug-testing plan had surprised her.

“I was surprised by the public response, a little surprised that I’d seen the headlines about it,” she said.

“I don’t know what the reason is but it’s got people talking, I think we live in interesting times. It’s good to have this conversation.”

Leave a Comment